How to Trust Yourself After Failure – Addiction Recovery

Relearning how to trust yourself is an essential part of a successful recovery. Self-trust will help you believe in yourself.

How to Start

Once you start believing in yourself, you would develop a mindset to work hard at your rehabilitation. Then you will be less likely to give up, and your journey towards sobriety will most likely be successful. Self-trust is like having an internal GPS. You know where to go next, you trust your decisions, both big and small, and you’re willing to take risks. I like that because when you start to rely on yourself, you won’t fear the failure of making a mistake. The process of restoring your self-trust will take time, patience, and commitment, but it is possible.

Become someone that you can rely on. Please take on the mindset of learning to be reliable and accountable to yourself. Do your best to keep promises, to be on time, stick to the goals that you’ve set, show up for yourself, and show up for others.

Don’t Forget to Celebrate

Acknowledge your accomplishments. Celebrate the mini-milestones and victories along the way. This will help build your confidence, which is key to building self-trust. Focus on the now. Dwelling on past mistakes would do you no good. That actually will hold you back. But developing a new relationship with yourself and leaving the past behind is going to benefit you. After you’ve done this, set and achieve goals. If you set yourself up to win, you will boost your belief in your own abilities. Be patient with yourself and the process. Your recovery is a lifelong process, and you may have relapses, you may fall, but if you do get up, dust yourself off and start the process all over again. Learn from all your mistakes. Remember, you are accountable to only yourself.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

Remember, you don’t have to travel on this journey alone. At Burning Love Outreach, we speak out loud, so others don’t have to suffer in silence. Hold on, and remember don’t give in, don’t give up, and don’t give out.

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Should You Trust Someone After Lying?

Should You Trust Someone After Lying?

Trust is essential in every relationship. I don’t care what type of relationship you are in. There must be trust. Trust is the result of trustworthy actions. Should you trust someone after they have lied to you?

Should You Trust Someone That Has Lied To You?

I want you to ask yourself this question, have I ever lied and was sorry about the lie that you told? If your answer is yes, then yes, you should trust a person who has lied, especially if they admitted they lied and they repent and come and ask for your forgiveness. We all tell lies because we’re afraid of the consequences of the truth, but forgiving a person who has lied to us means that we will no longer hold that against them. Not only does it free them, but it releases as you.

How Do I Trust Them Again?

Now, that doesn’t mean that the relationship will return to where it was before. In all honesty, trust takes time to rebuild. What rebuilds trust is trustworthiness. But don’t forget, God calls us to forgive. Forgiving one another is based on God’s forgiveness of us. He doesn’t wait for us to be trustworthy before he forgives us. With that same measure, we should forgive. Remember, the goal of forgiveness is reconciliation, not separation.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

You don’t have to travel on this journey alone. At Burning Love Outreach, we speak out loud, so others don’t have to suffer in silence. Hold on, and remember don’t give in, don’t give up, and don’t give out.

How To Deal With A Loss Without Turning To Substance Abuse

When we lose someone or something, whether it’s a job or a loved one or a near and dear relationship to us during recovery, it can be not easy and may even trigger the urge to turn to drugs and alcohol to cope. Using a mind-altering substance may feel like the only way to escape the pain, but there are other ways to get through difficult and challenging times.

What To You Do When You’re Faced With Loss And Disappointments

Disappointments in life and losses are going to happen. However, they can be especially difficult for individuals who are in recovery. If you turn to drugs and alcohol to relieve the pain, this will only undo all the hard work you put into your recovery process.

Please use what you have learned and do some of the things that I’m going to recommend today. Continue going to your support groups and your sessions and your meetings. This will only help you cope with your situation and give you the support you need. Call a sponsor or a friend from that support group because they’re there to help you. They are willing to help you through whatever difficult times you may be facing. Avoid letting yourself be exposed to triggering situations, avoid people, avoid places that will make you relapse. Get active, start exercising. That’s a great way to escape. Plus, if you start exercising at least a couple of times a week, this will alter your mood. Start spending time with others. Don’t isolate yourself and have a pity party. This will only make your situation feel worse. Spending time with others is actually great therapy, and it will help you get your mind off of your loss and help with your healing process. Decide to cope with your loss, whatever that loss was, healthily.

What If You Relapse?

You use to rely on drugs and alcohol to deal with life, but that’s not the case anymore. That was your coping mechanism. Now you’re trying to reprogram your behavior, so you can heal in a way in which you can avoid relapse. If you happen to relapse, I want you to seek help as soon as possible. You don’t want to restart the cycle of long-term addiction. Remember, you’re not alone, and help is available.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

You don’t have to travel this journey alone. At Burning Love Outreach, we speak out loud, so others don’t have to suffer in silence. Remember, don’t give in, don’t give out, and don’t give up.

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How to Regain Trust After Addiction, Lies, and Betrayal

Addition is a Family Disease

Damaged relationships can be repaired after addiction. When one person in a family develops a substance abuse issue, it doesn’t only affect them. No matter what their particular drug of choice happens to be, their addiction is a family disease because everyone is affected.

Someone who is actively using drugs will usually lie about how many drugs they are consuming or even deny that they’re taking drugs at all. This is one of the symptoms of the disease, and it’s quite common for addicts to manipulate loved ones if it means they can get resources such as money and food, a place to stay that will support the addiction.

How to Rebuild Relationships

The key to healing from addiction and rebuilding trust after the addict in your family has hurt all of you, let you down, disappointed you, caused all kinds of chaos more times than you can count is a drug and alcohol treatment program.

Then that individual must take responsibility and deal with the aftermath of events that occurred when they were still using. One thing that must be done is to eliminate any unhealthy relationships. They will do more harm than good. Relationships with individuals who actively use could be the reason that you slip back into relapse.

Addiction is an equal opportunity damager and destroyer of relationships. Anyone close to you has the potential to be affected by substance abuse. Whether it’s your spouse, your parents, your children, and your friends. I’ll give you some tips to use that can help rebuild relationships. The perfect time to start rebuilding burnt bridges, as I call them, with family and friends is in treatment.

Reach out to those people you want to reconnect with. Send an email, send a letter, give a phone call, but you can let them know that you’re in the process of getting your life back on track and you would like for them to be a part of it. Be honest and direct about what you want. Apologize for what has happened and ask for forgiveness, but I don’t want you to beat yourself up over past events.

Once you have asked for forgiveness draw a line through it. Move on. You can’t change the past, but you can move forward from this point and make better decisions. Initiate contact with your loved ones. Your family and friends may be hesitant about contacting you in the early days of your recovery, and trust is probably still an issue with them. Let them know that now you are a healthier version of ourself, free from chemical dependency.

Keep attending your meetings, keep attending your counseling sessions, and then your loved ones will see you walking the walk, and they will see that you are trying to get your life back on track, and you will demonstrate to them that you are serious about your recovery.

You don’t have to discuss what takes place in your sessions, but you can let them know that you’re on the right track. Be patient. It takes time for your loved ones to come around after you have lied to them and betrayed them, and there are trust issues there. They may not believe that you have been transformed by such a short time in treatment, but as time goes by, they will see you making an effort, to be honest, and direct with them. Trust will develop over time.

Moving Forward

Start living in the here and now. Deal with issues in your life as they come up. Don’t let things pile up in your relationships. Be honest and always ask for help if you need it. Additional support is always available, and if you need help, do not hesitate to reach out.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

Remember, you don’t have to travel on this journey alone. At Burning Love Outreach, we speak out loud, so others don’t have to suffer in silence. Hold on, and remember don’t give in, don’t give up, and don’t give out.

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From a Parents Perspective – Having a Child Addicted to Alcohol and Drugs

Today we are discussing some issues that our guess Tim’s son Jimmy encountered. He passed away in 2011 at the age of 46. He succumbed to many years of alcohol and drug abuse. We are having a discussion about that tonight and how it made Tim feel from a parent’s perspective and the heartache he encountered.

Jimmy’s Childhood

Both my wife, June, and I had our businesses. We were retailers in a small town and demanded a lot of our time. So the kids were pretty much left on their own. They’d get off the bus at the end of a 500-foot laneway and go in and wait for us to get home at six or seven o’clock, five nights a week. We often didn’t get home till nine or ten because we were open till nine on Thursday and Friday. The Retail hours were long and hard, and we didn’t have enough time to spend with the children and raising them. I imagine that’s part of the problem that led to Jimmy’s abuse of various drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, there are probably many people in the same situation that June and I, we’re in. You’re trying to work and supply a living for the family. Unfortunately, sometimes, if you don’t have a support system close to helping you look after them, children are often left alone.

I had gone to church as a child and stopped going in my early teenage years, as was the case with many people. June wasn’t raised in a church-going home. So we didn’t attend church as a family. It was a kind of an awkward situation. She just wasn’t interested in going. She didn’t feel compelled to do so. However, I tried to get us involved in a church in town. I had a good friend who was a pastor there, and he and I would spend a lot of time talking. But as a family, we did not attend. We probably went to church maybe half a dozen times as a family.

I never drank with Jimmy, and I didn’t know what marijuana was back then. But we did play on many sports teams together, and he would go off with a few members of the club and have a few pints, I guess. But he never really drank in front of me. I never saw him drink as a teenager for sure. Later on, of course. It’s funny, as close as we were and as much time as we spent together, I never really saw him drinking. I saw him in a drunken state a few times but never witnessed him using alcohol or marijuana. It wasn’t until later on, when he was away, that he got involved with some harder drugs.

Trying To Get Him Help

June was more involved and more instrumental in trying to get him help. He was institutionalized a couple of times through KMH and Browns in Toronto. He’d come out after a 30-day stint and go on a binge to celebrate his new freedom. We didn’t seek the right kind of help. We weren’t able to be on the same page and help him.

But most of what was done for him at that time was done by my wife. He and I didn’t communicate about his problems. I guess I was in a state of denial. First off, I didn’t understand addiction. I prided myself in having tried a lot of things but never really got hooked on anything. I didn’t understand addiction and couldn’t share or talk to Jimmy about the problem. As I say, we were close in many ways in that we played a lot of sports together, but there wasn’t a father/son relationship where I could help him. I think the main thing for people is that they have to share the problem with parents who have a child with a problem. They have to open up. They have to have the child open up and share and get involved in a program of some sort, whether through church or school, and work with the child. I, unfortunately, didn’t do that with Jimmy.

Jimmy was married, and unfortunately, he was given a sort of an ultimatum. After a couple of years of marriage, his wife gave him an ultimatum and said, either you quit drinking, or we split. Jimmy chose to split. I know that I’ve talked to her recently, and she looks back on it and thinks that maybe the ultimatum wasn’t the way to go.

What You Need To Know About Addiction

Many people don’t understand addiction, and they don’t realize that it’s an illness. It’s a sickness. It’s an illness. It’s a disease. It’s something that needs to be treated. I looked at it as bad behavior rather than something they couldn’t control or that they were addicted to.

Sometimes, addictions are attributed to some traumatic trauma that we’ve had in our lives or something. It’s a cry for help. It is a cry for help. And the individual, whoever is suffering, needs help. They’re sick; they’re ill. A lot of people look at it as bad behavior. Or some people would look at the addicted person and say, “You know what? You need to get your life together. It’s something deeper than that, and they need help. They are sick. It’s an illness, just like someone with cancer. If you’re diagnosed with cancer, you’re going to the doctor. They are going to treat that cancer. When someone has an addiction to alcohol and drugs, they need help. They need to have a cure for that.

It’s so important that we would be more in-tuned and more compassionate and more loving and reach out and not give up on them. Yes, they hurt the family a lot. They do a lot of bad things. But it’s not them. It is the drug. The mind-altering drug that they are dealing with makes them do all these different things.

Health Issues

Jimmy’s main problem was that his liver deteriorated substantially, and he was in line for a liver transplant for a couple of years before his death. Finally, it was all arranged, and there was a liver available. He went into the hospital and got a virus in the hospital. That’s really what took him down. He never did get his transplant. He passed. Before this happened, I visited him with two pastors from my church. They talked about his passing, his dying, and talked about Jesus. Then Jimmy accepted Jesus as his Lord and savior.

I remember I had this jersey, a special jersey that I had for Jimmy because he loved hockey. We both love hockey, and I had a jersey for him that I wanted to give to him. I remember being upset that I didn’t get a chance to give him his jersey. But I gave him something else. I gave him the chance to receive salvation. That is the best gift that he could have received. This happened on one particular day, and the next day Jimmy transitioned. He had received Jesus as his Lord and Savior, which is incredible news. I mean, despite how much we love him, how much we miss him, and no parent ever wants to lose a child, I tell you that was the best news that you could have given me, that I could have heard, was the fact that he received his salvation. So we knew when he transitioned, where he was.

If you have a child that is struggling with addiction it is so important to thoroughly understand addiction and how to help them. Watch the interview to hear Tim tell the whole story of his son Jimmy’s struggle with drugs and addiction and how he learned how to cope with the loss of his son.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

You don’t have to travel on this journey alone. At Burning Love Outreach, we speak out loud, so others don’t have to suffer in silence. Hold on, and remember don’t give in, don’t give up, and don’t give out.

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Should I Seek A Relationship While In Recovery?

Being in a relationship is already complicated on its own, but if you factor in someone having an addiction, this only complicates things even more.

How Your Relationship Could Impact Your Recovery

An active addiction will destroy a relationship almost every time, but it is possible to have a healthy, loving relationship with a recovering addict. Addiction will impact every area of your life, especially relationships. It destroys trust, intimacy, stability, and communication. If you have to date again, and you’re in recovery, do not stop your recovery. Don’t push it to the side or place it on the back burner. I highly recommend that you be cautious, honest with yourself, and careful not to forget that you’re in recovery. There should be a balance between your recovery and your love life.

Experts recommend that you wait at least a year before addicts start a new relationship, and I think that’s very good advice. You may feel like a year is a long time, and it is to some people, but relationships can sometimes be a distraction from a successful recovery. We don’t want you to become distracted, especially when you have worked so hard, and you’ve been doing well in your recovery.

During the first year, you need the focus on nothing but getting better, finding yourself again, and getting your life back on track. Relationships, sometimes fail and if you find yourself in a relationship where you’re arguing, you’re being confronted with infidelity, or you’re deciding to go your separate ways, this can trigger a relapse, and we don’t want that to happen. If this happens, feelings of abandonment, depression, and unworthiness can cause pain for the person in recovery and possibly even lead to a relapse.

Guidelines For Dating

I would urge you to spend at least the first year working on yourself, concentrating on your recovery, then if you do decide to date, take some time. Get to know the person before diving into a full-blown relationship, and let me make this one point clear. Do not date someone only for sex. That’s a recipe for disaster. Do not make the relationship the main focus of your life because your recovery should be the main focus.

I’m going to give you some advice. You should date someone who does not have any substance abuse issues. If they have had any past issues with mind-altering substances, I will suggest not getting involved with that person.

Secondly, date someone supportive of your recovery. Date someone who desires a long-term relationship. Date someone you are comfortable introducing to your family and friends, someone who shares your interests and your values. Be honest, right up front with them as soon as you meet them. Let them know you are in recovery, and your recovery is a top priority. Let me tell you something, if that is the right person for you, they will understand.

Be Honest With Yourself

Ask yourself if you’re using the relationship as a crutch or distraction. Ask yourself some questions. Do I like this person? Is this person supportive? Do you find them to be honest? Are they dependable? Are they respectful of your recovery process? Do you find yourself making compromises that don’t feel good? Do you find yourself doing things to please them? You must ask these questions because you are serious about your recovery. While in recovery, you’re taking on a new lease in life, and you’re probably somewhere where you have a very good support system.

Don’t Keep Your Relationship a Secret

Make sure you share your new relationship with your sponsor, your counselor, your friends in recovery, your therapists. Don’t keep it a secret. If you feel like you need to keep this relationship a secret, that is a sign, it may not be suitable for you at this particular time in your life.

Secrets and lies are associated with your past. Now you’re trying to leave all traces of the past behind. You should be able to have an open discussion about your new relationship and any issues that you may encounter. You may be concerned that others may not approve of your newfound relationship, but don’t be afraid to ask for advice or share with your team of supporters. They’re there to help you. Remember, this is all about you having a successful recovery and your relationship; it’s not a good time for you.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

You don’t have to travel on this journey alone. At Burning Love Outreach, we speak out loud, so others don’t have to suffer in silence. Hold on, and remember don’t give in, don’t give up, and don’t give out.

From Crack Cocaine to Bodybuilder

Introducing our guest who grew up in Pensacola, Florida. He is a graduate of Woodham High School, class of ’80. He played football at Hampton University in Virginia. He served four years in the US Air Force. Despite every obstacle that came his way, he continued to be a true son, brother, father, and friend. He’s been married for 17 years to his lovely wife, Melissa. They have five beautiful children, four girls, one boy. He’s described as being a great human being and a breath of fresh air. Our guest enjoys bodybuilding, and also, he is associated with the Supernatural Bodybuilding, which is a Christian-based organization. And he has participated in several competitions with OCB Professional Bodybuilding Organizations. Please, welcome Carlton Andy Shoemoe.

What Did The Path of Destruction Look Like, and How Did it Make You Feel?

I’ll tell you what, when you are on that path, you see nothing, but it’s dark. You see no light. I mean, sometimes you see a glimmer, but you’re like, either I’m going to beat this or I’m going to die. Then, it was an option. You’re gone. You can go or take yourself out, but it was ugly. You had to face it; you’re full of shame. That was the ugliest time. It was very dark. That’s the best way I could describe it. One thing I could say about crack cocaine, it takes you to a bottom real quick. It doesn’t take years and years. It’ll take you there in months. It took me to the bottom quickly.

The Effects of His Drug Addiction, On His Marriage and His Relationship With Your Daughter

It put a strain on my marriage, but now and then, my wife would try to use it with me, and we would neglect our daughter. We would leave her to stay with your grandmamma and, we’d get loaded. I’m just going to be straight with you. Eva, my child, sometimes, she went with me to pick up drugs. Fortunately, she’s a forgiving child too. It caused us to separate three or four times. I would be moving to get high without her, and I didn’t have any responsibility.

She was born into my drug addiction. Oh. I went intense with it went deep with it when she was about two. that went on for the next four years. She remembers it too. She does not remember watching me get loaded, but she can remember daddy acting funny. She would always ask me. “What’s wrong, daddy?” This shows that even though we think our children may be too young to comprehend what we’re doing, they may not comprehend, but they know that something is going on.

Working During Addiction

I was a functional junkie. I mean, I had my days where I took off or tried to blame it on something else. I worked, and people knew something was going on, and they would tell me, this is not you, man. What’s going on? And even at the time, my dad was still working out there too, at the meet. He’d get funny looks, like something going on with your son, you know?

I still have this job today. I would say I was one of the blessed people who could continue with their current employer and still be employed throughout my drug use and addiction. Because that is one thing a lot of people do is they really, they mess up at work and end up getting fired because they do exactly what you just described. They call in for work. They’re missing work a lot. It ends up for many people being the end of the road for them at their place of employment. They were accepting of people coming forward and say, look, I got a drug problem or look, I got an alcohol problem. And they bent as much as they could to help me out. They put me through rehab twice. Not once, but twice because I went to them and said, Hey, I got a problem. The second time’s the charm.

Was The Drug Addition Because of Your Environment or Just Your Own Doing?

My parents did not do drugs. They were the type, maybe have a glass of wine here and there or a beer, you know? And that’s all that was accepted. That’s as far as you were going to go to their house. At first, I tried to blame them, where you didn’t come to my graduation. So no, that didn’t work. You can blame them for everything, but we grew up in a middle-class neighborhood, as you said. The majority of people that were raising kids there were military retirees. Did you remember that? And so those are the men that came to make a living for their families, hardworking men. So I can never blame my upbringing at all. To this day, they still are beautiful people. Very wonderful.

Relationship With Parents During Drug Addiction

You know how they always say, you think they don’t know, but they knew. My dad broke me down one day. He said, promise me one thing. I said, what? He said stop getting loaded. I knew me, and I was struggling. He took me to rehab the first time. He said I’m going to take you. It was heartbreaking, watching him walk away. But he had his days, because of people saying, your son, I think he out here getting high. But they stuck with me. They prayed, even when I got clean, I went, I would stay with them sometime. I wake up in the morning and get ready to go to work. I see my daddy down on his knees. I knew I was in their prayers. I knew I was probably the head of the prayer. But through prayer and patience, and he tells me today, yeah, I’m very proud of you, son. They have been very instrumental in my recovery.

I encourage family members to not give up on your loved one who is addicted to drugs. Continue to pray for them; continue to support them because they need that support. I think that makes a lot of difference in your recovery. That instead of talking about you or throwing you to the side and just saying or giving up hope that you would ever overcome this, they must continue to pray for you and support the person who is struggling with drug abuse and addiction.

How The Addiction Started

I was 13 and wanted to be accepted in a crowd. I was hanging around people with light skin. It’s just crazy. I’m just going to be straight with you. We were considered unacceptable looking, so I thought, okay, well, if I can’t hang with you, good looking folks. I can hang with the guys that’s smoking pot, and I was accepted in that crowd. So, that’s the crowd I stuck around.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to do so, for us, o we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

Inspiration to RISE – My Interview With The TLC Church, Pastor Brian & Sabrina Foerster

At Burning Love, we focus on individuals who are suffering from drug abuse and addiction. It does not matter what walk of life you are coming from; you will be welcomed at TLC. Some people, they would not necessarily admit it. But if they are looking for someone somewhere to go and worship, why would they want to come to TLC?

Why Come To TLC Church?

TLC is home, and we try to make it feel like home. We try to make it feel like family. One of our slogans is welcome home. It honestly, from the minute you walk in, if you are new to the church, you will not get ignored or forgotten or pushed aside. Several people will greet you. People love to meet and talk and engage, and pre-COVID, you would have got a hug because everybody loves to hug. Everyone is treated like family; it does not matter your ethnicity, your background. I am very much a visible minority at our church, and I love it. It’s fun, and it’s where we belong. It is where everybody belongs, and everybody fits in, and everybody is included and feels like they belong and are involved.

Are The Doors Open To Anyone?

Absolutely, and that is what our rules are. one of our goals is to reach the community; you have to be willing to engage and accept the community. Not everybody will be somebody who grew up in the church, or they could have been in the church and fell away from the church or had different life decisions that came about. We love you, and we accept you. We want you to hear the Lord’s word and want you to feel love and see what the church supports to feel like. You might’ve had a bad experience in the past, but we want to change that experience for you.

Well, a lot of people who suffer from drug abuse and addiction, they are looking for something. Usually, what that something is, is they are looking for love. And that is one of the things that is so prevalent at the TLC church. 

Why Does Love Exude From Everyone At TLC?

We had set the foundation for love and acceptance and understood that we are all equal when we come to the Lord. There is no difference. There is no hierarchy with the Lord. It does not matter what our past may look like. It does not matter what our struggles may look like. We all struggle, and we all fall. You know some of us to get up faster than others. Some of us need help to get up, but regardless, we have all struggled and all fallen and made that clear to the congregation, making that clear to the people we have to forgive. We have to love, and we have to move on. There is no benefit in looking back and harboring onto hard feelings or living with guilt. We have to lay that all aside and love and foremost, Jesus tells people or tells us that people know us by our love. If we can not love one another within the church, how do we take that outside of the church? This is why we practice and get a lot of practice within our church walls, learning to love one another, despite our differences, putting that all aside, and recognizing that the blood of Jesus unifies us, the cross is a unifier.

One of the things that we try and do is to set an example with that. For instance, in the mornings on Sunday, we get busy doing different things. Before we start service, we need to gather together to pray for the pastors, get out, greet everybody, and say good morning to everybody before service. We are very deliberate in doing that because we want people to know that we appreciate the effort they made in being there and their commitment to being there and that they are not forgotten and that it is recognized. Then at the end of service, we would say good day to them and wish them a happy week, letting them know we will be praying for them. We are very deliberate in making them feel welcomed and loved and missed if they have missed time. 

It does not matter what you are struggling with if you are struggling. It does not have to be drugs. It does not have to be an addiction to drugs. Whatever your issue is, do not wait until you are clean up. Our doors open at TLC for you. 

TLC’s Mission And Your Vision

Our mission is to be a community of believers devoted to God’s word, empowered by the Holy Spirit because we can not do anything without the Holy spirit’s power. There is a lot of that word love again, and to build up one another, encourage one another, reach people with Peter’s gospel, which is why that is our mission. That mission does not change. It does not change the fact that it is the word of God that we preach. It does not change the fact that it is the Holy Spirit who empowers us, and without him, we can not do anything. It does not change. It will never change that we are called to love one another and build each other up and encourage one another. And then to take that into the world and share that gospel, share that love with other people.

The mission of the church remains the same throughout the year. The vision, however, will change as we meet the goals of our vision. We have three keywords, and we go over them over and over again, it’s gather, grow, go. This means that We gathered together to worship Jesus as our Lord and savior. That’s the foundation of everything that we do. We are motivated to grow in faith and grow each other and grow together both spiritually and physically and numerically. That is what we are supposed to do. Then we are equipped to go into the community and the world to share God’s word that has been implanted and instilled in us and to be able to share our faith and be able to share and live and be able to live and be an example of it.

It’s TLC sounds like a loving welcoming community that you would like to be a part of and learn more about continue listening to the interview by watching the video above. Also check out their website to learn more information and get in contact with TLC.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to do so, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

Inspiration to Recover From Addiction – Interview With Apostle Sylvia Shipman

She is a minister, she’s an intercessor, a counsellor, and holds an honorary doctoral degree in theology. She’s a mighty vessel of God, and she operates under the healing and prophetic anointing. A life coach. A recovery coach. She is also the founder of I Am That I Am seminars, Destiny Consulting, and Jubilee Community Development Corporation. She’s a wife, and she has been married to Calvin for 21 years. They have two sons, Jeremiah and Timothy. They reside in the beautiful Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area of Virginia. Meet Apostle Sylvia Shipman.

What Are The First Steps Of Recovery?

Just in my training and working with individuals, the first thing individuals must do is admit that there is a problem. You and I may see the problem. Everyone around them may know the problem. But they must recognize that it is a problem. Therefore, the process begins when they say, “Hey, I have a problem with substance abuse. I have a problem with street drugs,” or whatever their addiction may be. Here the platform is substance abuse, drug usage abuse. Therefore, the individual must admit that I have a problem.

That is the first step. Once they realize that it is a problem, then the healing begins, the work starts. That individual usually is open for change at that point because some of us have experienced that. Without loved ones or whoever we keep talking to and talking to them and talking with them, it’s like, “I don’t have no problem. I don’t know what you’re talking about.” When they get to that place that they recognize it’s a problem, the process began at that point. The first step is acknowledging that you have a problem. Not us saying you have a problem but must admit that they have a problem and then move from there.

What Is The Difference Between Drug Abuse And Drug Addiction?

Now you know that it’s a little slight differentiation there. Drug abuse is a habitual taking of addiction to illegal drugs. Drug abuse can be compulsive, excessive, and self-damaging the use of habit-forming drugs or substances. Addiction, that’s one lead into the other. The addition is the fact or condition of being addicted to a particular substance, thing, or activity. When a person takes a drug and abuse that drug, it could easily slide into addiction.

When we see people abusing drugs, we automatically say they are addicted to drugs. But the abuse would turn into an addiction. Still, when we see it in our natural eyes and the person just taking drugs, taking drugs, and taking drugs, just because they feel like they need the drugs, it can become addicted to the medication.

Advice To Young People Who Are Being Offered Drugs For The First Time

That’s a good question because we’re dealing with marijuana being legalized, and now people feel like, “Hey, it’s just marijuana.” But we know that when you start creating an addiction, it opens the doors for many. Some parents will say, “Well, I tried marijuana. It’s okay. I’m fine,” and they will not correct that child to say, this is not the path that I want for you. We always say to the child, “Just say no,” but that’s hard to say no. I still like to give the child a sample like this, okay, what is it profiting you to use marijuana? They don’t know how to answer when I say, “Okay if you continue to use marijuana, how is it profiting you?” Then they still are like, “I don’t know,” because they are doing it because their peers are doing it. Everybody’s doing it. Remember, we got so many things feeding our eye gates, our ear gate, and formulating our decision.

The children nowadays, and of course we can say back in our day, we had these same temptations, but it’s, on the whole, another level now where these things are everywhere, on television and everything. I mean, they’re turning the marijuana and put it in these pretty long like cigars. You think they are smoking the cigar, and they are passing around marijuana. All these things are formulating our children’s thinking, and they make them believe that it’s cool, and it’s okay. We have to be the voice in our children here.

When they lay down, I always tell my boys that I want you to hear my voice in your ear. “mom does not like this. Mom has a problem with this”. Somebody’s going to be in their ear. I will advise the parents; you be the voice in your children’s ear.

Want to learn more advice about how to keep your kids away from drugs?

Hear the rest of apostle Sylvias interview by watching the video above.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook; we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms, and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to do so, so we can continue to put this word out and continue to help those addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.

Interview With Ashley Palmer – The Queen of Relapse

Let’s welcome Ashley Palmer; she has been through it all and calls herself the queen of relapse. Can you relate to this title? Let’s see what advice and tips and knowledge she can give us.

The Beginning of Her Despair

You know what? We know that you endured a lot of blows in life. As I said, you were in the boxing ring of life. If you were to compare where you are today to where you were a few years ago, one would say you have experienced a transformation in your life. I was hoping you could share with us where you were when you were at the lowest of the low in your life when dealing with alcohol and cocaine.

When I think about Ashley three to five years ago, the first thing that I think about is just so much self-hatred. So much self-hatred. I hated myself, and I was so insecure that being in my own mind, in my own skin, was awful. I think that’s why I turned to drugs and alcohol so much because it was a way for me to get out of my own mind and numb out. When I was partying, I seemed to think I was funnier, prettier, cooler, and more connected with people. I don’t have a really low bottom, but I do have many bottoms. With some of those bottoms, I was just miserable.

I would call my family three to four times a week, crying, making up some nonsense about something silly. I would make mountains out of molehills, and I would take these things that were just little things in life. But because I was so emotionally unstable and I felt so broken. These little things would bother me so much, and I’d call my family all the time, just needy and unstable and emotional. I didn’t know how to deal with my emotions. I just freaked out all the time about everything. That’s why Monday to Friday, it would be white knuckle, get through the workweek. Then the weekend would come, and I would always end up partying. It turned near the end when I was at my lowest was it was no longer just a Friday night going out for some drinks, maybe dabbling in some drugs. I couldn’t drink. I couldn’t have one drink without seeing your dealer’s name at the bottom of your cup, automatically start craving drugs. Then that turned into a whole another story.

Then all of a sudden, it was like I started Friday night, and on Sunday afternoon, somehow, I had still been high and drunk, and I was supposed to go to work the next day. I was missing work on Mondays, trying to be sick. You can only be ill so many Mondays without people wondering. Right? I was lonely. I didn’t have any real connection with anyone. I didn’t have any real friends. I had fair-weather friends that wanted to party. I didn’t feel like I had a lot of connection with real friends. That’s because I chose to hang out with the wrong people. It got to the point where I couldn’t live my own life anymore because being in my head was more of an emotional rock bottom where I just hated my life and the way I was living.

How It All Began

I want to go back to maybe when you were in high school. What were those times like for you in high school and college as far as the drugs and alcohol were concerned?

I was a party girl. That’s when I started. I started drinking and partying in high school. I had gone into high school very insecure, but I ended up twitching as a kid. In hindsight, it’s been brought up in therapy that it might have been trauma because of my mom passing. So kids would make fun of me. I couldn’t control my own body. I would do embarrassing twitches, like stop and touch the ground or gulp in my throat or something. I was already insecure. I go into high school, and high school is hard enough to feel like you’re fading in.

I went through all the different groups in high school: the jocks, the bellies, the ravers, the nerds. I went through all the groups searching and just partying with all these different people. It just steadily got worse. It started with getting high on weed. Then it was like partying every weekend but with booze. I had a group of friends like, “Hey, you’re going to throw up at this party? Do this line of cocaine because it’s going to sober you up so you can keep drinking, and you’re not going to be sick.” Then that changed the whole game from that point on. I was about 16 at this point. I didn’t even want the liquor. I didn’t want the weed. I wanted to start drinking to go and find cocaine after.

How Weed Can Lead You Down The Wrong Path

I find that most people, when they graduate to more inducive drugs, that they started out by smoking weed. It’s usually around junior high or high school. Once you start smoking weed, you can start with the cocaine, the heroin, whatever the other drugs are of choice. It sounds like you were Known as the party girl in high school.

Yeah, I started with the weed, but I wouldn’t say I liked weed. And apparently, I wouldn’t say I like downers either. I never liked weed. It made me paranoid. I liked the beginning of drinking, but then I didn’t like the feeling because it’s a downer. It turns out I’m an upper person, as we can tell because I love caffeine, and I liked cocaine. It’s funny. I was smoking weed just because I didn’t want to be in my own skin and being high, even though I was uncomfortable, it was better than being sober.

What The Missing Piece Was, That Could Not Be Filled

Why do you think you were smoking the weed during cocaine and drinking? Were you looking for love in maybe all the wrong places or something? Was something missing out of your life that made you turn to those things?

100%. I mean, looking back now, I can easily say what I was missing was God. I always say that everyone has a God-shaped hole in their heart. When I found God, that was filled. But back then, I didn’t have God. Every one of us craves connection. I searched and grasped because of my insecurity and wanted to connect with people and feel like I belonged somewhere. I still am friends with some of the people from my past, but my picker was off. I would pick people to hang out with that I shouldn’t have hung out with. I was searching for something, and I didn’t know it then. But now, I can see I needed God.

Do you relate to Ashley at all? Finish Ashley’s story by watching the video above and find out how she overcame her constant relapses and trauma.

Reach Out To Us

Here at Burning Love Ministry, we support you, and we encourage you today to please reach out to us.

You can leave a prayer request there here

You can reach out to us here

You can look at some of the other blogs that we have here.

Find us on social media!

We’re on Facebook, we’re on Instagram, we’re on LinkedIn and YouTube.

You can reach out to Burning Love Outreach on any of these platforms and we are more than willing to help you.

For those of you who have partnered with us, we thank you so much.

If you haven’t partnered with us and you feel called to do that so we can continue to put this word out and can continue to help those who are addicted to drugs and addiction. Please click here to donate.